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Full text of "Flora Indica Vol-I"

INTRODUCTORY ESSAY.                                   47
often obscure, so that a number of the genera described by
Loureiro have not yet been identified, while others, not being
recognized, have been described as new, and re-named by sub-
sequent botanists.
We must refer to the Introduction of Wight and Arnott'
for full details regarding the illustrious series of botanists*,
commencing with Konig and ending with Wallich, who in-
vestigated with so much success the-botany of continental
India. The volumes of the ' Asiatic Researches/ and of most
of the systematic works of the end of the last and beginning
of the present century, afford ample proof of the value of
their labours; but none of them brought their materials to-
gether in the form of a flora, except Roxburgh, whose f Flora
Indica* however remained in manuscript for some years after
his death, in 1815. Two-editions of it have been published
since that period; one, which is incomplete, was edited by
Drs. Carey and Wallich; it extends to the end of Pentandria
Monogynm, but contains in any additional plants not con-
tained in Roxburgh's manuscript, and requires therefore oc-
casionally to be quoted; the other, which is an exact reprint
of the manuscript as left by its author/ is in three volumes,
and was published in 1832.
Besides editing this portion of the f Flora Indica' of t)r.
Roxburgh, Dr. Wallich commenced, in India, an illustrated
work on Nipal plants, -which was the first specimen of iithor
graphy ever produced in that country; and after his return
to England, he published a series of 296 plates of plants in
the' Plantae Asiaticse Rariores/ a work which, with the equally
valuable Coromandel plants'of Dr. Roxburgh, in three folio
yolumes, with three'hundred coloured plates, forms the prin-
cipal contribution of the Indian Government to the illustwu
tion of botanical science.
The eastern or Malayan Peninsula of India was unknown
botanically till it was visited by Jack, whose descriptions of
* Jones, Fleming, Hunter, Anderson, Berry, John, Koxbmgli, Heyne, Klein,
Buchanan Hamilton, Russell, Koton, Shutcr, Goran, Finlnysoii.